I just started a book called Graven Ideologies: Nietzche, Derrida, & Marion on Modern Idolatry by Bruce Ellis Benson. I have only gotten about 20 pages in and have already found it quite interesting. Among the handful of great statements I have come accross so far are these.

… “At this point, though, it should be clear that at least one danger in philosophizing is that our theories reflect more of ourselves than of the phenomena we are attempting to explain.’ …
…”Even though Paul’s cautionary word should not be taken as being necessarily against philosophy in general, I think it is not too much to say that Western philosophy has at least tended toward idolatry from it’s very beginning. Indeed Nietzsche thinks that the whole history of philosphy has been more or less one idol after the next”…
…”In other words, philosophy has tended to assume the possibility of an unmediated immanence in which ‘all that is’ can be known directly and completely.”…
…”In positing this idea of a universal Truth, Plato in effect sets up a double transcendence. The first aspect of this transcendence is metaphysical. Plato claims that Truth has a particular sort of being, beyond any particular spatiotemporal boundaries and so beyond the realm of changing reality. The second transcendence is epistemological. Human beings can trenscend themselves and the world of immediate experience. The radicality of the dream becomes clear when we consider what it entails”…
…”But note that this second sense of transcendence negates the first sense. If I am able to transcend the boundaries of my world and my time, then that which I seek to understand is itself no longer transcendent. This point is particularly important in regard to idolatry. If I can transcend my finitude to understand God in his fulness, then God is — at least to me — no longer transcendent. One cannot have it both ways. Either God is transcendent and so my knowledge of him never fully transcends the limits fo my time and place, or I become transcendent and God thereby becomes fully immanent to me”….
… “to whatever extent God becomes immanent, to that extent he loses transcendence.”…

I’ll probably post more from and about this book later. I have really enjoyed reading it so far. The question of philosophy’s place in history and in the church are questions that I have sought to answer for my thesis and this book is a great help.

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